Blog

Blog

Seed Stratification – Maskiikii Gitigan

The winters are cold in Minnesota. In order for native seeds to survive the winter, they go dormant, and when the days start to warm in the spring and the ground thaws, they come out of their dormancy and germinate. The process of replicating this winter dormancy in order to germinate the seeds on your own is called stratification. If you are hoping to grow native plants from seed, which is the most cost efficient way to get native plants in your garden, there are a few ways to stratify them.

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Lakota Food Summit

o the Lakota Food Summit in Rapid City from February 14th to the 17th. They had a wonderful time connecting with others about a love of food sovereignty!

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Garden Update 9/28

While fall creeps in, garden manager Louis has big plans for winterizing. Most of our plants have been harvested, save from some tomatoes, squash, and peppers still. But the big […]

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Meet Thomas Andrade

Thomas Andrade came to visit us as a part of our training program here at the Indigenous Food Lab. He currently lives in Anchorage, Alaska with ties to the Tseshaht, […]

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Garden Update 9/3

As we approach the end of the growing season, the garden is beginning to look more and more wild. The amaranth is seeding and it’s falling over due to the […]

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Live Cooking Demo

On August 11th, we partnered with Accenture to offer a live cooking demo doubling as a Accenture employee fundraiser to benefit our work here at NATIFS. We went live at […]

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Drying Tobacco

Tobacco is a very hardy plant that enjoys lots of heat but not humidity – if the plant is too wet it can become weak and thin. It can get […]

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Heat Waves and Droughts

Recently it seems like there is an excessive heat warning almost everyday. We have been getting only slight possibilities for rain and we are not the only ones in North […]

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Garden update 7/20

It’s been a couple weeks since our last garden update, and boy have things taken off! The amaranth and sunflowers are so tall you can barely see over them. The […]

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Lending a Hand

With the opening of our sister restaurant Owamni nearing, some of their staff has been working with us in the Indigenous Food Lab (IFL) to research, taste, and develop their […]

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Garden Update 6/28

So it’s been a couple of weeks since things started sprouting in the garden, and we’re really starting to see some growth now. Starting to see our first squash fruits, […]

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Foraging, Harvesting, and Drying Nettle

Last week, the kitchen staff headed out to Battle Creek Park in St. Paul to go foraging. They carefully harvested a bunch of stinging nettle (using leather gloves of course!). Now despite the stinging hairs all along the leaves and stems and their bad reputation, there are actually many uses for nettle both edible and medicinal.

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Welcome!

Welcome to the NĀTIFS blog! We’re happy to have you!

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Garden Update 6/1

Well, we finally have plants in the ground! After clearing out the garden, we’ve begun seeding some of the empty beds and have discovered that there are a lot of […]

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Garden Update 5/19

This summer, we are working in partnership with the Indian Health Board (IHB) to cultivate a medicine garden (mashkiikii gitigan in Anishinaabe) at the 24th St. Urban Garden in Minneapolis. […]

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